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You are here: Home / News & Events / Events / CLS Speaker Series_check_then_delete / 2016-2017 / CLS Meeting Series - Gerrit Jan Kootstra (Penn State University)
 

CLS Meeting Series - Gerrit Jan Kootstra (Penn State University)

How short-term and long-term experience shape bilingual language use: A focus on cross-language priming and interactive alignment
When Feb 20, 2015
from 09:00 AM to 10:30 AM
Where 127 Moore Building
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How short-term and long-term experience shape bilingual language use: A focus on cross-language priming and interactive alignment

Abstract:

It is evident from many studies that bilingual language use is influence by cross-language interactions, such as code-switching and syntactic transfer. These cross-language interactions can be caused by ‘long-term’ linguistic experience, such as a bilingual’s experience with both languages in daily life, but also by ‘short-term’ linguistic experience, such as interactive alignment in dialogue / structural priming across languages (i.e., the tendency to re-use recently processed words and syntactic structures across languages). I will present mostly experimental but also corpus-based research on how these different sources of linguistic experience influence bilingual language use. I will focus on (1) direct and cumulative effects of cross-language structural priming on Dutch-English bilinguals’ syntactic choices, (2) cross-language structural priming as a potential mechanism of contact-induced language change in Papiamentu-Dutch bilinguals, and (3) priming / interactive alignment as a mechanism of linguistic choices in code-switching. I will end with current plans to gain more insight into the process of interactive alignment by measuring both comprehension and production processes in code-switched dialogue. In all presented studies, bilinguals’ daily language experience and/or language dominance play an important role, and from usage-based and psycholinguistic perspectives are combined as much as possible.