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You are here: Home / News & Events / Events / CLS Speaker Series_check_then_delete / 2016-2017 / CLS Meeting Series - Michael Frank (Stanford University)
 

CLS Meeting Series - Michael Frank (Stanford University)

Predicting pragmatic reasoning
When Jan 30, 2015
from 09:00 AM to 10:30 AM
Where Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library
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Title: Predicting pragmatic reasoning

Abstract:  A short, ambiguous message can convey a lot of information to a listener who is willing to make inferences based on assumptions about the speaker and the context of the message. Pragmatic inferences are critical in facilitating efficient human communication, and have been characterized informally using tools like Grice's conversational maxims. They may also be extremely useful for language learning. In this talk, I'll propose a probabilistic framework for referential communication in context. This framework shows good fit to adults' and children's judgments. In addition, it makes interesting novel predictions about both language acquisition and processing, some of which we have already begun to test.

Title: Predicting pragmatic reasoning

Abstract:  A short, ambiguous message can convey a lot of information to a listener who is willing to make inferences based on assumptions about the speaker and the context of the message. Pragmatic inferences are critical in facilitating efficient human communication, and have been characterized informally using tools like Grice's conversational maxims. They may also be extremely useful for language learning. In this talk, I'll propose a probabilistic framework for referential communication in context. This framework shows good fit to adults' and children's judgments. In addition, it makes interesting novel predictions about both language acquisition and processing, some of which we have already begun to test.