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You are here: Home / News & Events / Events / CLS Speaker Series_check_then_delete / 2016-2017 / CLS Speaker Series - Anna María Escobar (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) CLoTILdE Project: Defining Semantic Influence in Quechua-Spanish Contact
 

CLS Speaker Series - Anna María Escobar (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) CLoTILdE Project: Defining Semantic Influence in Quechua-Spanish Contact

When Oct 16, 2015
from 08:30 AM to 09:15 AM
Where Moore room 127
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CLoTILdE Project: Defining Semantic Influence in Quechua-SPanish Contact.

Long-term and intense Quechua-Spanish language contact has given rise to non-lexical contact phenomena in the Andean region. In the Peruvian case, due mainly to population movements that have taken place in the region since the early 20th century, Andean contact features are also found in non-Andean regions, such as on the coast and in the capital (Lima). Innovative morpho-syntactic features in the region take the form of new patterns of use (e.g., accusative clitic doubling), Zdrojewski & Sánchez 2014; possessive su, Escobar 2014) and of innovative functions (e.g. evidential Present Perfect, Escobar 1997, Jara 2013; inalienable possessive su, Escobar 2014), although the processes that explain the trajectories of the contact influence are not clear.

The CLoTILdE' Project brings together researchers from the U.S. and Peru in the pursuit of an innovative historical and sociolinguistics study that analyzes almost 50 years (from 1968 to 2015) of real-time oral Peruvian Spanish data with the goal of determining the trajectories that define 'Andean contact influence' (or 'semantic influence') in Peruvian varieties of Spanish.

In this presentation, I present examples of how properties of inalienability, and evidentiality from Quechua underlie innovative functions found in Peruvian varieties of Spanish, that are consistent with cross-linguistic tendencies. The presentation calls for rethinking methodologies for the study of language contact with ethnocultural languages, such as Amerindian languages.