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You are here: Home / News & Events / Events / CLS Speaker Series_check_then_delete / 2016-2017 / CLS Speaker Series - Melinda Fricke (Penn State University) Production and perception of codeswitching: Leveraging linguistic variation to study processing
 

CLS Speaker Series - Melinda Fricke (Penn State University) Production and perception of codeswitching: Leveraging linguistic variation to study processing

When Jan 22, 2016
from 09:00 AM to 10:30 AM
Where 127 Moore Building
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Production and perception of codeswitching: Leveraging linguistic variation to study processing

 

The linguistic form of codeswitched speech represents the end of a long chain of psycholinguistic planning processes that went in to producing it.  Consequently, the study of codeswitched speech can yield insight into the psycholinguistic factors that modulate cross-language activation during bilingual speech planning.  Further, to the extent that cross-language activation gives rise to distributional regularities in the surface form of speech, laboratory experiments can exploit these regularities to shed light on the learning processes that allow (or don’t allow) listeners to develop sensitivity to informative cues during language comprehension.  In this talk, I describe a set of studies that follow this logic, first asking how cross-language activation during spontaneous speech planning affects the surface (phonetic) form of codeswitched bilingual speech, then investigating the extent to which listeners with different language backgrounds can perceive and make use of the relevant linguistic variation.  I will discuss the implications for models of bilingual language processing, and will also consider the ways in which the results are relevant for psycholinguistics and linguistics more generally.