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You are here: Home / News & Events / Events / CLS Speaker Series_check_then_delete / 2016-2017 / CLS Speaker Series - Rhonda McClain (Penn State University) Zooming In On Interaction Between Planning and Articulation Through the Lens of Disruptions
 

CLS Speaker Series - Rhonda McClain (Penn State University) Zooming In On Interaction Between Planning and Articulation Through the Lens of Disruptions

When Feb 17, 2017
from 09:00 AM to 10:30 AM
Where 127 Moore
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Zooming In On Interaction Between Planning and Articulation Through the Lens of Disruptions

A challenge in research on speech production has been determining whether interaction spans a single level at most or extends across several stages of processing. Many studies have demonstrated that semantic and phonological stages of lexical access involve co-activation of multiple representations, influencing the output of selection at adjacent stages of processing. There is also some evidence that effects originating in phonological planning extend to phonetic processing, altering the phonetic properties of speech. However, evidence for interaction extending from lexical access to phonetic processing is inconsistent. I will present a study conducted in collaboration with colleagues at Northwestern that aimed to demonstrate the extent and ways in which, activation of non-target forms influences phonetic processing. We exploited the sentence completion task to investigate whether disruptions that produce consequences for lexical access also affect articulation. We tested this hypothesis by varying the degree of cognitive disruption. In Experiment 1, we examined young adult monolinguals. In Experiment 2, young adults completed the paradigm under time-pressure. In Experiment 3, we examined a group of older adults, for whom normal cognitive aging increases the demands of lexical access. Our results revealed extended interaction from planning to articulation that was greater in Experiment 2 relative to the baseline of Experiment 1. We observed facilitation in all experiments when picture targets matched the expected sentence completion, but there was no evidence of semantic interference. I will discuss the implications of these results for dynamic accounts of interaction during speech production.