• hero-1.jpg
  • hero-2.jpg
  • hero-3.jpg
  • hero-4.jpg
  • hero-5.jpg
  • hero-7.jpg
  • newhero-1.jpg
  • newhero-5.jpg
  • newhero-6.jpg
  • newhero-7.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_1_Fa16.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_2_Fa16.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_3_Fa16.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_4_Fa16.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_5_Fa16.jpg
You are here: Home / News & Events / Events / CLS Speaker Series_check_then_delete / 2016-2017 / CLS Speaker Series - Sarah Grey (Penn State University) Comprehension of foreign-accented speech: evidence from ERPs and neural oscillations
 

CLS Speaker Series - Sarah Grey (Penn State University) Comprehension of foreign-accented speech: evidence from ERPs and neural oscillations

When Oct 23, 2015
from 09:00 AM to 10:30 AM
Where 127 Moore Building
Add event to calendar vCal
iCal

“Comprehension of foreign-accented speech: evidence from ERPs and neural oscillations”

Worldwide, there are more multilingual than monolingual speakers and, by extension, more accented than non-accented speakers of English and many other world languages. Language is used and processed in context-rich social situations that are often layered with pragmatic content, but we know surprisingly little about how this contextual-pragmatic content affects the neurcognition of language. Here, I focus on an important yet under-studied area of research in the neurocognition of language: the effects of foreign-accented speaker identity as a pragmatic cue that influences language comprehension, and the impact of individual variation in listener experience, perception, and attitudes on comprehension. In this talk, I will present recent findings from an experiment that tested neuropragmatic sensitivity in monolingual listeners who were recruited to have limited experience with foreign-accented speakers. Listeners heard sentences that were well-formed or had an error in grammar or semantics; sentences were spoken by either a native-accented or a foreign-accented speaker. I will discuss our behavioral results for sentence comprehension, accent perception, and attitudes as well as two brain-based measures of sentence processing: ERPs and time-frequency analysis of neural oscillations.