• hero-1.jpg
  • hero-2.jpg
  • hero-3.jpg
  • hero-4.jpg
  • hero-5.jpg
  • hero-7.jpg
  • newhero-1.jpg
  • newhero-5.jpg
  • newhero-6.jpg
  • newhero-7.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_1_Fa16.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_2_Fa16.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_3_Fa16.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_4_Fa16.jpg
  • CLS_Hero_5_Fa16.jpg
You are here: Home / News & Events / News
 

News

CLS Job Opening: Lab Manager/Research Assistant

The Center for Language Science (CLS) at Penn State seeks candidates for the position of Lab Manager/Research Assistant.  The CLS (http://cls.psu.edu/) is an interdisciplinary group of linguists, psycholinguists, applied linguists, speech-language pathologists, speech scientists, and cognitive neuroscientists who share an interest in language acquisition and bilingualism.  CLS researchers employ a variety of methods including behavioral measures, eye tracking, electrophysiological methods (EEG/ERP), and fMRI.  Responsibilities for this position include assisting with a wide variety of CLS research projects, managing the laboratory operations (including equipment maintenance and participant scheduling), and providing support for weekly meetings and other CLS events.  Knowledge of E-prime, SPSS, and MATLAB is desirable, as is experience with eye tracking and EEG/ERP methods.  Training and experience with at least one technical method (eye tracking, EEG/ERP, speech analysis in Praat, etc.) is required.  Additional training will be provided for technical methods, and also for the conduct of research with human participants.  Candidates should have strong interpersonal, communication, and organizational skills, the ability to manage multiple simultaneous projects, and a strong curiosity and interest in language science research and methods. Knowledge of and experience working with languages other than English is also desirable but not required.  This position is ideal for someone who has completed undergraduate studies in a language science related field and wishes to gain additional laboratory experience before applying for graduate school. Typically requires an Associate's degree or higher plus one year of related experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. A Bachelor’s degree is preferred.  The successful candidate will have had laboratory experience as an undergraduate, preferably with both behavioral and cognitive neuroscience methods.  Interested applicants should include in their submitted materials a listing of three names of references.  Questions about the position can be sent to Dr. Frances Blanchette (fkb1@psu.edu).  The appointment date will be no later than September 1st, 2017. This is a fixed-term appointment funded for one year from the date of hire with possibility of re-funding.  Apply online at https://psu.jobs/job/69332

CAMPUS SECURITY CRIME STATISTICS: For more about safety at Penn State, and to review the Annual Security Report which contains information about crime statistics and other safety and security matters, please go to  http://www.police.psu.edu/clery/, which will also provide you with detail on how to request a hard copy of the Annual Security Report.

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

Congratulations to Jack Dempsey!

We've recently received the wonderful news that CLS Lab Manager Jack Dempsey has accepted a position in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Educational Psychology PhD program, in their Cognitive Science of Teaching and Learning (CSTL) division, where he'll be working with Kiel Christianson. 

Jack will remain on board with us until August 11th, when he'll depart for Illinois to begin his exciting new graduate career. Please join me in congratulating Jackon this great accomplishment!

Volunteer at Exploration-U

Our second Exploration-U event of the year is being held at Bald Eagle Area High School on Monday, February 27th from 6-8pm and we are asking for volunteers to help out at our exhibit tables.  Please find the flyer for this event attached.  This is a great opportunity for us to engage in the community and share our knowledge of language science. 

If you’re interested in volunteering and representing the CLS at this upcoming event, please email  no later than Friday, February 17th. Thank you in advance for your consideration!

Adele Miccio Memorial Travel Award – Spring 2017 Competition

Because we have some funds left over from the Fall 2016 competition, we are re-opening the competition for the Spring. Please note that travel must still be completed by the end of 2017.

Our late colleague, Professor Adele Miccio, loved to travel and cared deeply for students.  In her honor, the Center for Language Science sponsors a student travel award.   Although many graduate students attend professional conferences, it is often difficult in this context for them to meet and discuss their work with more senior scientists. Networking experiences are an important way in which individuals become known in the professional community, develop collaborative relationships, and arrange informal visits outside of professional meetings. Given the relatively short time frame of the tenure period, it is essential that individuals learn to make these connections to others in the field early in their careers. Therefore, the purpose of this award is to provide incentives for planned networking and resources for these experiences.

Applicants for the award will generate a plan for travel to meet with one or more senior scientists.   In most cases, the applicant will visit the laboratory or working environment of the scientist.  In some cases, the applicant will attend a conference or workshop where he/she can arrange meetings with one or more senior scientists.  If meetings at a conference are proposed, the applicant must explain how there will be adequate time for meaningful private meetings in that context.  After the travel plan is completed, the student will provide a brief written report of the experience, and will give a presentation at a CLS meeting to share the experience with other students. The awardee must still be a graduate student at the time of travel.

Here are examples of types of networking experiences that have proven beneficial in the past.

The applicant makes a two-day visit to a university with an active language science program.  While there, the applicant presents at a colloquium and a lab meeting, meets with graduate students and post-docs from several labs, has meetings with several faculty members whose research is relevant to the applicant’s own, and has 2 extended meetings with the researcher who is the sponsor of the visit.  In these meetings, the applicant receives detailed feedback on a manuscript and a grant proposal, and future collaboration is planned.

In another scenario, the applicant attends a small international conference at which several researchers from Europe will be present—people who live too far from the applicant for a lab visit to be feasible.  Because the conference is relatively small and does not include parallel sessions, the applicant is able to arrange ahead of time to meet 3 of the international researchers individually to discuss their presentations as well as preliminary data collected by the applicant.  One of these meetings occurs soon after the applicant’s own presentation, so he/she is able to receive direct and immediate feedback.  One of the researchers agrees to serve as a consultant on a grant application.

Submission requirements:

  1. Cover sheet with the following information: Your name, department, address, phone, email address and the name of your advisor(s).  Indicate type of networking: either visiting another lab or targeted networking at a conference.   Applicants must be doctoral students who have passed their candidacy, and must be regular attendees of the CLS Friday morning meetings.  Please note that unlike the PIRE grant, the Miccio Award is intended to support professional development through networking, not direct research activity.  Be sure that your application describes a networking plan.  Our resources are limited, so applicants who have received a previous Miccio Award will not be eligible.

 

  1. Provide a networking plan - A 1-page, single-spaced, 12-point font summary of
    1. Networking plan and its impact on the applicant's research program
    2. Provide specific reasons for the proposed visit and specific goals to be accomplished during the visit (e.g., learn a new technique, collaboration, exchange of ideas, receive input on a grant proposal or a manuscript).
    3. If planning a lab visit, state the length of time of the visit and provide a concise justification for the time frame; i.e., how you will be able to accomplish your goals in the time planned (longer is not necessarily better, it depends on the situation).
    4. If planning to meet one or more individuals at a conference, meeting times should be at least tentatively set and described in the application, explaining how the meeting(s) will be productive in the often hectic atmosphere of a conference; also, explain how the meeting will contribute to your goals in a way that email correspondence would not.
    5. Describe the extent of prior contact, if any, with the targeted senior scientist
    6. Include corroborating letters from
      1. the targeted senior scientist/s confirming the proposed networking plan
      2. your doctoral advisor stating support for the plan
      3. A budget page showing the projected expenses including travel (e.g., airfare), lodging, conference registration.  There is an upper limit of $1000 for the award.
      4. A copy of your up-to-date CV.

How to submit an application:

  1. All applications should be submitted electronically to the Chair of the travel award committee at the email address shown below. All of the application materials should be submitted as an integrated single PDF file with materials in the order listed above and emailed to the committee chair as an attachment.
  2. Questions may be addressed to the Chair of the travel award committee.

Winners will be required:

  1. To submit a one page report on the networking experience and accomplished goals
  2. To present at a CLS meeting to share the networking experience with other graduate students.

Relevant Dates:

Deadline for submission:  March 27, 2017 by 5 pm.

Date of announcement of awards:  April 7, 2017

Period for using the award:  May 2017-December 2017

Deadline for submitting the final report:  no later than 6 weeks after returning from the funded trip

Date for CLS Presentation:  In the semester following receipt of the award

 

Travel Award Committee Chair

Chaleece Sandberg                                                                                                 

Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders                              

                                                                                    

863-2006

Volunteer opportunities for The North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad

We are asking for you to please consider volunteering some of your time this semester to mentor students at the State College Area High School in preparation for them to attend NACLO.   

What is NACLO?

The North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad is a contest in which high-school students solve linguistic puzzles.  In solving these puzzles, students learn about the diversity and consistency of language, while exercising logic skills.  Professionals in linguistics, computational linguistics and language technologies use dozens of languages to create engaging problems that represent cutting edge issues in their fields.  The competition has attracted top students to study and work in those same fields.  It is truly an opportunity for young people to experience a taste of natural-language processing in the 21st century.

Should you be interested in volunteering, it would require that SCASD have background checks/clearances on file for those individuals.  I’m more than willing to assist anyone interested with obtaining the appropriate clearances and ensuring that all paperwork is sent to the school.  The CLS is willing to reimburse any fees associated with obtaining clearances.     

This would be a wonderful opportunity for anyone interested in this community outreach initiative.  Please let me know at your convenience if you’d be willing to help out.  More information about this event is available on their website http://nacloweb.org/.  Any additional questions may be directed to , , or as they’ve all helped out with this in the past.

Fellowship deadline for the 2017 Linguistic Institute

The 2017 Linguistic Institute of the LSA will take place at the University of Kentucky, and applications for fellowships to attend are being accepted until Feb 1.  

Reminder: Judith Kroll Undergraduate Research Award Deadline

This is a friendly reminder that the deadline for applications for the Judith Kroll Undergraduate Research Award is January 30, 2017.  Please send all application to Giuli Dussias at

Postdoctoral position at Penn State: Cognitive neuroscience and divergent thinking

Job Announcement Postdoctoral Scholar, NSF-funded project on divergent thinking, ideation, and brain activity

Qualified individuals are invited to apply for a postdoctoral scholar position in the area of cognitive neuroscience and creativity. The fellowship is supported by a collaborative NSF-grant, awarded to a team of researchers at the Pennsylvania State University (PI: Dr. Janet van Hell; Dept. of Psychology) and the University of Oklahoma (PI: Dr. Zahed Siddique; Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering). The postdoctoral scholar will be stationed at the Pennsylvania State University. 

We are looking for an innovative postdoctoral candidate with a strong neuroscience background (in particular electroencephalography, EEG) who will play a key role in this NSF-funded project that examines different interventions to enhance divergent thinking and ideation in engineering students. Specifically, the project combines EEG techniques (including analysis of task-related EEG power changes and analysis of Event-Related brain Potentials) in a pretest-posttest design to track changes in brain activity patterns associated with divergent thinking, in different types of engineering interventions. 

Candidates must have a Ph.D in Neuroscience, Psychology, Neural engineering, or a related field, or have completed all of the requirements for a Ph.D by the time of appointment. Experience with EEG techniques is strongly preferred. The postdoctoral scholar will be expected to design and coordinate experiments, present data in national and international meetings, and write manuscripts. Extensive mentorship is available for these activities to help prepare for an independent research career. The postdoctoral scholar will have ample opportunities to interact with several vibrant research communities at Penn State University (including the Center for Language Science, http://cls.psu.edu; the Center for Brain, Behavior, and Cognition, http://cbbc.psu.edu; and the Social, Life, and Engineering Sciences Imaging Center, http://www.imaging.psu.edu). The initial appointment will be for one year, with the possibility of renewal for a second year. Salary and benefits are based on NSF guidelines, commensurate with experience and qualifications. 

Interested candidates should upload a CV, a cover letter with a statement of research experience and interests, and 2-3 recent publications at https://psu.jobs/job/67501. Additionally, applicants should arrange for three letters of recommendation to be sent separately to Dr. Janet van Hell at jgv3@psu.edu. Review of applications will begin on December 15 and continue until the position is filled. The start date of the appointment is flexible, although an early 2017 date is preferable. For more information about this position, please contact Dr. Janet van Hell at 814-867-2337 or jgv3@psu.edu.

President Barron blogs about the power of language

At a recent brown bag luncheon, Penn State President Eric Barron learned about the Center for Language Science, an outfit that examines everything from language acquisition to bilingualism to cognition to neurobiology. Click on the links below to access the Penn State News release as well as President Barron's blog:

http://news.psu.edu/story/437579/2016/11/14/administration/presidents-blog-power-language

http://diggingdeeper.psu.edu/2016/11/the-power-of-language/

Graduate application deadline for Summer 2017 moved to January 9, 2017

Announcing International Research Opportunities for CLS Graduate Students Spring and Summer 2017
Spring 2017 application deadline: November 10, 2016
Summer 2017 application deadline: January 9, 2017

The Center for Language Science (CLS) announces the final cycle of PIRE Graduate Fellowships for the 2010-2017 National Science Foundation program Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) – also known as the first ('old') PIRE grant. The CLS will award travel grants to graduate students to support travel to international sites for the purpose of conducting research on the science of bilingualism. The PIRE grant “Bilingualism, mind, and brain: An interdisciplinary program in cognitive psychology, linguistics, and cognitive neuroscience,” awarded to the CLS for a 5-year period (2010-2015, and two-years extension 2015-2017) and ends July 2017. In this final year of this PIRE grant graduate students working with CLS faculty can apply to travel for 2 months in spring 2017 and summer 2017 and conduct a research study at one of the international sites listed below, or to travel for a short-term visit up to 4 weeks in spring 2017 and summer 2017 (with the possibility to conduct research, receive training, or lay the groundwork for future collaboration).

The following institutions in Europe and Asia participate in the 2010-2015/17 PIRE program: University of Braunschweig (Germany), Radboud University Nijmegen (the Netherlands), University of Granada (Spain), Universitat Rovira I Virgili (Tarragona, Spain), Lund University (Sweden), Bangor University (UK), Beijing Normal University (China), and University of Hong Kong (China).

Funding for the 2-months visit in spring 2017 covers stipend and tuition for the semester, airfare, housing, and some research expenses.
Funding for the 2-months visit in summer 2017 covers airfare, housing and meals, and some research expenses.

Funding for short-term visit in spring 2017 and in summer 2017 covers airfare, housing and meals, and some research expenses if applicable.

Important: both the 2-months and short terms visits in summer 2017 must be completed by the end of July.

All application materials should be sent electronically to the PIRE Graduate Fellowships committee at piregrads@gmail.com. No hardcopy applications will be accepted. Applications will be evaluated by this committee, if necessary in consultation with the relevant foreign PIRE partner.

1. Application materials:

(1) Copy of applicant’s Curriculum Vitae
(2) A statement of no more than 2-3 single spaced pages indicating how the research-

abroad experience will enhance the applicant’s future educational and professional plans. The statement should specifically provide a justification for the way in which the requested international experience will enhance the planned research and will further the student’s professional development. If the student has already had international research experience (including a previous PIRE fellowship), it will be critical to explain how the proposed visit will provide unique benefits above and beyond those from these past experiences. Highest priority will be given to those applications that make clear how the particular features of the proposed PIRE site will enhance the student’s research program.

(3) A letter of recommendation from the CLS faculty research advisor. The letter of recommendation must be sent directly to the CLS committee at piregrads@gmail.com.

2. Eligibility requirements:

  1. (1)  To be eligible for the PIRE graduate travel award, candidates must be US citizens. This is an NSF requirement. At the start of this PIRE program, the College of Liberal Arts had generously provided additional funds for non-US citizens for the duration of the grant (2010-2015), but these funds are now spent out as we are in the second no cost extension.

  2. (2)  Must be actively conducting research with a CLS faculty member.

  3. (3)  The planned project for the proposed research experience should fit with the goals of the CLS PIRE project and with the existing PIRE partners and host sites (see the abstract for the PIRE grant appended below). Note that there are also opportunities for CLS graduate students who wish to seek training at one of the two domestic PIRE sites (Haskins Laboratories or Gallaudet University) but those opportunities must be

    coordinated with eventual research abroad.

  4. (4)  Eligible students will have a minimum of at least one semester in residence remaining

    at Penn State after returning from research abroad experience.

IMPORTANT:

Graduate students interested in applying for a PIRE award should meet with their faculty mentors to discuss the content and timing of their applications. Faculty mentors should make the first approach to an appropriate PIRE partner to determine the feasibility of the proposed visit. Please feel free to be in touch with any of us if we can be helpful in facilitating arrangements and contacts.

Award#0968369 - PIRE: Bilingualism, mind, and brain: An interdisciplinary program in cognitive psychology, linguistics, and cognitive neuroscience

(abstract original proposal):
This PIRE project, a collaboration between three U.S. and seven foreign institutions in Europe and Asia, will investigate the cognitive and neural consequences of bilingualism to understand the ways in which multiple languages are learned and used. Recent behavioral and neuroscience evidence suggests that there is more extensive processing interaction between the two languages of a bilingual than previously thought, and this is true even when bilinguals are using only one language. Bilingual science therefore provides a tool for revealing fundamental principles about the mind and the brain otherwise obscured in research focused on monolinguals. The next stage of research on bilingualism calls for national and international collaborations to unify our understanding of the nature of the bilingual mind and brain, the process of bilingual language development, and the consequences of bilingualism for cognition. International collaboration is essential for accessibility to widely differing bilingual populations of several spoken, written, and signed languages. This award enables an international network of collaborators with common research goals and methods to exploit unique and complementary opportunities to investigate properties of human languages. Leveraging the diverse perspectives inherent in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural research will facilitate the establishment of a world-class research context for investigating bilingualism science, enable generalization of research findings, and exploit bilingualism as a tool for investigating the representation and processing of language in the mind and brain.

This PIRE project will bring together the complementary international expertise of collaborators studying bilinguals who communicate in a variety of languages (e.g., Spanish, Catalan, Welsh, and Chinese). A unique feature of this project is the partnership of U.S. and Dutch scientists exploring the consequences of bimodal bilingualism in deaf people. The NSF-funded VL2 Science of Learning Center at Gallaudet University, a world leader in education for deaf students and research on topics related to deaf people, focuses on issues of visual language processing recognizing deaf readers as bilinguals using a signed language for communication yet reading a written language. Researchers in The Netherlands and Lund also study sign language and gesture, deaf literacy development, and speech-sign translation but using different signed and written languages. The convergence of these projects provides a unique opportunity for cross-linguistic collaboration and training that would not be possible in the U.S. alone.

Enthusiasm for bilingualism research naturally draws an unusually diverse group of students, scientists, and research participants. This PIRE project will be committed to harnessing that excitement to create opportunities for broadening participation in science by research participants from a broad spectrum of ages and linguistic abilities, and by students and researchers from groups under-represented in the sciences. This PIRE project will provide training and research opportunities to students and scientists not possible without the international collaboration, such as conducting research abroad, participating in virtual international colloquia, developing and sustaining international collaborations, and training by industrial partners with specific expertise in speech, literacy, and neuroimaging. The project also provides institutional opportunities for research with diverse populations, enriching undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral training, and increasing opportunities for early career faculty to develop research programs globally engaged and solidly grounded in cross-disciplinary collaborations. The nature of the science of bilingualism is inherently interdisciplinary and cross-cultural and this project provides opportunities for the participating U.S. institutions to strengthen international offices and activities, develop survey tools to evaluate student's international experiences, and provide energy and synergy for integration and for strengthening links across disciplinary units. This project will strengthen the U.S.'s scientific capital through international training not otherwise available in the U.S. U.S. institutions will benefit from

attracting international visiting researchers and students to enrich the internationalizing initiatives and cultures on their campuses. The U.S. population is also increasingly bilingual with ever-diversifying demographic and cultural characteristics so research results are expected to reach well beyond academia. U.S. project partners include The Pennsylvania State University, Gallaudet University (D.C.), and Haskins Laboratories at Yale University (CT). International partners include Bangor University (UK), University of Braunschweig (Germany), Radboud University Nijmegen (the Netherlands), University of Granada (Spain), Universitat Rovira I Virgili (Tarragona, Spain), Lund University (Sweden), Beijing Normal University (China), and University of Hong Kong (China). This project was jointly funded by NSF's Office of International Science and Engineering and the Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences. 

Bilingualism Matters at Penn State collaborates with The Center for Global Studies in their weekly World Stories Alive

 

Bilingualism Matters is excited to announce that we'll be collaborating with The Center for Global Studies in their weekly World Stories Alive event held at Schlow Library on most Saturdays this spring semester. The event is similar to our Bilingual Reading Corner, with the added benefits of some structured learning activities with the kids and a central location. 

 We're hoping some of you will be willing and able to volunteer to help us make this collaboration a success. We are in need of a native speakers of Korean for one of our remaining dates. If you'd like to volunteer to be a reader, or know of someone who would, please contact Frances Blanchette at fkb1@psu.edu.

Announcing the Judith Kroll Undergraduate Student Research Award

Purpose:  To provide support for promising undergraduate students working with CLS faculty for A) travel to a national or international conference to present their research; OR B) expenses necessary for the completion of a research project (e.g., participant compensation, testing materials, recording media).  The maximum amount available is $2500. 

Eligibility: 

Who:  Undergraduate students who are engaged in research with a CLS faculty member are eligible to apply for support for that research, or for travel to a conference in order to make a presentation on that research.  Because funds are limited,  students who have been recipients of a Kroll award may not apply again. 

When:  Applicants may request support for expenses that have already been incurred within the current academic year (e.g. apply in Spring semester for expenses incurred in the preceding Fall semester) or for expenses that will be incurred in the coming year.  However, funds cannot be awarded to students who have graduated (i.e., we cannot support travel to a conference in the summer for a student graduating the preceding spring).  Also, funds cannot be disbursed to graduates.  It is the applicant’s responsibility to plan ahead such that the expenses are incurred and can be reimbursed prior to graduation.

Obligations of awardees:

a. Submit a one-page report on the networking experience and accomplished goals within one month of the experience to the Chair of the Travel Award Committee.

b. Give a presentation about your research at a CLS meeting before the end of the semester following of the experience.

Application process:   

1. Cover sheet with the following information: Your name, department, address, phone, email address and the name of your faculty research supervisor. 

2.  Summary of research project - A 1-page, single-spaced, 12-point font summary of:

  • research question or hypothesis
  • why is this research important?
  • methods that were or will be used
  • predicted results

3.  Letter of support from your faculty research supervisor.

4.  If applying for travel to a conference, provide evidence that your presentation has been accepted. We understand that at the time of application, notification of acceptance may not yet be received; however, proof that the paper was accepted (e.g., an email from the conference organizers indicating that the paper was accepted for a paper or a poster presentation) must accompany all receipts submitted for reimbursement.

5.  A budget page showing the projected expenses.  There is an upper limit of $2500 for the award. 

  • For travel to a conference, expenses would typically include airfare (or other transportation), lodging, conference registration, and incidentals (taxi fare, meals, etc.).   
  • Research expenses might include participant compensation, lab supplies, testing materials, small equipment such as a portable digital recorder, etc. 

If you and your supervisor have any questions about eligible expenses, contact the chair of the award committee.

6.  A copy of your up-to-date CV.

7.  A copy of your unofficial transcript or degree audit.

How to submit an application:

1. All applications should be submitted electronically to the Chair of the travel award committee at the email address shown below. All of the application materials should be submitted as an integrated single PDF file with materials in the order listed above and emailed to the committee chair as an attachment.

2. Questions may be addressed to the Chair of the Travel Award Committee.

Deadlines

Applications are due the last Monday in January.

Applications will be reviewed and award recipients will be notified within a 3 week period following the deadline.

Funds must be expended no later than the end of the Spring semester one year after the application process. (Airfare and conference registrations should typically be prepaid using a University purchasing card; see Heather Mann in 102 Moore Building).

If traveling outside the U.S., you must receive approval through the Travel Safety Network (http://tsn.psu.edu/) at least 30 days before traveling, and the TSN approval email must be submitted along with receipts in order to receive reimbursement.  NO TSN, NO REIMBURSEMENT!

Please send all application materials to Guili Dussias at . 

Dr. Ping Li's Brain, Language, and Computation Lab picks the brains of potential STEM students

Two recent articles feature an exciting project called Brain3M, by CLS faculty member Dr. Ping Li's Brain, Language, and Computation Lab. The project provides virtual and 3-D printed brain models with the aim of enhancing middle school science education. To learn more, check out the articles here:


Dr. Brian MacWhinney presents “Limits on Success in Second Language Learning”

Dr. Brian MacWhinney, a faculty member at Carnegie Mellon University, will give a talk on “Limits on Success in Second Language Learning”.  The talk will be Thursday, September 8, 2016, from 4:00-5:30 at Foster Auditorium. Below is a description of the talk: 

Some learners of second languages manage to attain near-native levels of competence, whereas others settle for very incomplete levels even after decades of using a second language.  This wide variation in adult attainment contrasts sharply with the uniform success that children have in learning their first language, suggesting that there is a critical period for language learning that expires sometime during early adolescence.  Accounts for this decline have considered the impact of biological mechanisms such as lateralization, myelination, metabolic decline, synaptic pruning, and changes in NMDA receptor subtype, as well as network features such as entrenchment and gang effects. None these accounts can explain the full range of patterns of success and failure across the areas of phonological, lexicon, syntax, intonation, and conversational pragmatics.

The Unified Competition Model refocuses this discussion in terms of the dynamic interplay between a set of risk factors facing adult learners and a set of protective or support factors that they can use to overcome the barriers established by the risk factors.  The risk factors are entrenchment, transfer, overanalysis, and social isolation. The support factors combating these risks are resonance, decoupling, chunking, and participation.  The operation of each of these processes can be modeled by collecting data from experimentation and corpus analysis.  By examining in detail the differential operation of each of these factors on each linguistic level, we can gain a fuller picture of differences in patterns of second language acquisition in adulthood from which we can formulate effective ways of improving learning success.


Adele Miccio Memorial Travel Award for 2016-17

Our late colleague, Professor Adele Miccio, loved to travel and cared deeply for students.  In her honor, the Center for Language Science sponsors a student travel award.   Although many graduate students attend professional conferences, it is often difficult in this context for them to meet and discuss their work with more senior scientists. Networking experiences are an important way in which individuals become known in the professional community, develop collaborative relationships, and arrange informal visits outside of professional meetings. Given the relatively short time frame of the tenure period, it is essential that individuals learn to make these connections to others in the field early in their careers. Therefore, the purpose of this award is to provide incentives for planned networking and resources for these experiences.

Applicants for the award will generate a plan for travel to meet with one or more senior scientists.   In most cases, the applicant will visit the laboratory or working environment of the scientist.  In some cases, the applicant will attend a conference or workshop where he/she can arrange meetings with one or more senior scientists.  If meetings at a conference are proposed, the applicant must explain how there will be adequate time for meaningful private meetings in that context.  After the travel plan is completed, the student will provide a brief written report of the experience, and will give a presentation at a CLS meeting to share the experience with other students. 

Here are examples of types of networking experiences that have proven beneficial in the past. 

  • The applicant makes a two-day visit to a university with an active language science program.  While there, the applicant presents at a colloquium and a lab meeting, meets with graduate students and post-docs from several labs, has meetings with several faculty members whose research is relevant to the applicant’s own, and has 2 extended meetings with the researcher who is the sponsor of the visit.  In these meetings, the applicant receives detailed feedback on a manuscript and a grant proposal, and future collaboration is planned. 
  • In another scenario, the applicant attends a small international conference at which several researchers from Europe will be present—people who live too far from the applicant for a lab visit to be feasible.  Because the conference is relatively small and does not include parallel sessions, the applicant is able to arrange ahead of time to meet 3 of the international researchers individually to discuss their presentations as well as preliminary data collected by the applicant.  One of these meetings occurs soon after the applicant’s own presentation, so he/she is able to receive direct and immediate feedback.  One of the researchers agrees to serve as a consultant on a grant application. 

 

Submission requirements:

1. Cover sheet with the following information: Your name, department, address, phone, email address and the name of your advisor(s).  Indicate type of networking: either visiting another lab or targeted networking at a conference.   Applicants must be doctoral students who have passed their candidacy, and must be regular attendees of the CLS Friday morning meetings.  Please note that unlike the PIRE grant, the Miccio Award is intended to support professional development through networking, not direct research activity.  Be sure that your application describes a networking plan.  Our resources are limited, so applicants who have received a previous Miccio Award will not be eligible. 

2. Provide a networking plan - A 1-page, single-spaced, 12-point font summary of

a. Networking plan and its impact on the applicant's research program

b. Provide specific reasons for the proposed visit and specific goals to be accomplished during the visit (e.g., learn a new technique, collaboration, exchange of ideas, receive input on a grant proposal or a manuscript). 

  • If planning a lab visit, state the length of time of the visit and provide a concise justification for the time frame; i.e., how you will be able to accomplish your goals in the time planned (longer is not necessarily better, it depends on the situation).
  • If planning to meet one or more individuals at a conference, meeting times should be at least tentatively set and described in the application, explaining how the meeting(s) will be productive in the often hectic atmosphere of a conference; also, explain how the meeting will contribute to your goals in a way that email correspondence would not. 

c. Describe the extent of prior contact, if any, with the targeted senior scientist

3. Include corroborating letters from

a. the targeted senior scientist/s confirming the proposed networking plan

b.  your doctoral advisor stating support for the plan

4.  A budget page showing the projected expenses including travel (e.g., airfare), lodging, conference registration.  There is an upper limit of $2500 for the award.

5.  A copy of your up-to-date CV. 

How to submit an application:

1. All applications should be submitted electronically to the Chair of the travel award committee at the email address shown below. All of the application materials should be submitted as an integrated single PDF file with materials in the order listed above and emailed to the committee chair as an attachment.

2. Questions may be addressed to the Chair of the travel award committee.

Winners will be required:

a. To submit a one page report on the networking experience and accomplished goals

b. To present at a CLS meeting to share the networking experience with other graduate students.

 

Relevant Dates:

Deadline for submission:  November 4, 2016 by 5 pm.

Date of announcement of awards:  November 18, 2016

Period for using the award:  January 2017-December 2017

Deadline for submitting the final report:  no later than 6 weeks after returning from the funded trip

Date for CLS Presentation:  In the semester following receipt of the award

 

Travel Award Committee Chair

Carol Miller                                                                                                  

Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders                               

cam47@psu.edu                                                                                     

865-6213

Mary Grantham O’Brien, University of Calgary to present “Talking about stress: What’s the L1 got to do with it?"

Mary Grantham O’Brien, University of Calgary will give a talk on “Talking about stress: What’s the L1 got to do with it?” from 3:15-4:30 on Wednesday, Nov. 2, in 157 Burrowes.

Grant Berry published in Linguistic Vanguard

Congratulations to Grant Berry on the publication of "Processing linguistic variation through dual mechanisms of cognitive controls" in Linguistics Vanguard.

Ines Martin published in Foreign Language Annals

Congratulations to Ines Martin, whose article "Pronunciation Training Facilitates the Learning and Retention of L2 Grammatical Structures" has just been accepted for publication in the journal Foreign Language Annals (FLAnnals).

Miguel Ramos Riquelme Dissertation Defense

On Thursday, August 18th, Miguel Ramos Riquelme will be defending his dissertation entitled, “A diachronic variationist approach to the study of subject pronoun expression in Spanish: first-person singular”.  The defense will be at 11:00 AM in 101 Old Botany. 

PIRE undergraduate featured in Penn State News

2016 PIRE students Margaret Featherstone and Erika Exton have recently been featured in Penn State News.  Click the link below to access the article: 

Undergraduate students conduct research abroad

Postdoctoral Fellow Clara Cohen accepts position as Lecturer in English at the University of Glasgow, Scotland

Congratulations to Clara Cohen, who has accepted a position as Lecturer in English at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

Rena Torres Cacoullos awarded NSF grant

Congratulations to CLS faculty member Rena Torres Cacoullos, whose project "Code-switching in spontaneous bilingual speech" has been recommended for NSF funding! Learn more about Rena's exciting work on code-switching here: http://nmcode-switching.la.psu.edu/

Bilingualism Matters is accepting applications for a Bilingualism Outreach Assistant

Bilingualism Matters is now accepting applications for a Bilingualism Outreach Assistant! Interested graduate students are invited to apply via eLion (job 71195). To find out more about this exciting opportunity, contact Frances Blanchette at fkb1@psu.edu.

Bilingualism Matters at the Central PA Arts fest

Come check out the Bilingualism Matters booth during the Chidlren's Day at the Central PA Arts Fest. We hope to see you at the all day affair!

Professor Katharina Schuhmann joins the German Department and linguistics faculty!

The CLS is pleased to announce that Katharina Schuhmann has accepted our position as assistant professor of linguistics and German. Katharina will be joining us in January 2017, and will also bring an exciting research paradigm to our community.

Congratulations to Angela Grant who wrote a beautiful piece on second language learning which was posted on the homepage of the website of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society.

Congratulations to Angela Grant who wrote a beautiful piece on second language learning which was posted on the homepage of the website of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society.  Click on the link below to access the article. 

Second language learning

Congratulations to Judy and Giuli whose essay on the benefits of multilingualism was featured in PSU News.

Congratulations to Judy and Giuli whose essay on the benefits of multilingualism was featured in PSU News.  Click on the link below to access the article. 

The benefits of multilingualism


The CLS officially welcomes Dr. Deborah Morton to the Linguistics Faculty

Congratulations to Dr. Deborah Morton, who has officially become a 3-year visiting assistant professor in Linguistics. Dr. Morton, who has already spent a year at Penn State, brings a broad range of expertise in phonology, African languages, language contact, and field methodology. We welcome you (back) to the CLS!

The BiLD lab makes an appearance in the Penn State News

Congratulations to Janet van Hell and the Bilingualism Language and Development (BiLD) Lab, who recently represented Penn State and the National Science Foundation at the fourth Annual USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington, DC. In an effort to inspire children to explore careers within language research and STEM sciences in general, the BiLD lab made the Penn State news. You can read more about it here!

The CLS is recruiting for a Lab Manager/RA position

The Center for Language Science (CLS) at Penn State seeks candidates for the
position of Lab Manager/Research Assistant. The CLS (http://cls.psu.edu/) is
an interdisciplinary group of linguists, psycholinguists, applied linguists,
speech-language pathologists, speech scientists, and cognitive
neuroscientists who share an interest in language acquisition and
bilingualism. CLS researchers employ a variety of methods including
behavioral measures, eye tracking, electrophysiological studies, and fMRI.
Responsibilities for this position include assisting with a wide variety of
CLS research projects, managing the laboratory operations (including
equipment maintenance and participant scheduling), and providing support for
weekly meetings and other CLS events. Knowledge of E-prime, SPSS, and MATLAB
is desirable, as is experience with eye tracking and event related potential
methods. Training will be provided for technical methods, and also for the
conduct of research with human participants. All candidates should have
strong interpersonal, communication, and organizational skills, the ability
to manage multiple simultaneous projects, and a strong curiosity and
interest in language science research and methods.

This position is ideal for someone who has completed undergraduate studies
in a language science related field and wishes to gain additional laboratory
experience before applying for graduate school. The position typically requires an
Associate's degree or higher plus one year of related experience, or an
equivalent combination of education and experience. A Bachelor’s degree is
preferred. The successful candidate will have had laboratory experience as
an undergraduate, preferably with both behavioral and cognitive neuroscience
methods.

Interested applicants should include in their submitted materials a listing
of three names of references. Questions about the position can also be sent
to Dr. Frances Blanchette (fkb1@psu.edu). Although the start date is
flexible, the appointment date will be no later than September 1, 2016. This
is a fixed-term appointment funded for one year from date of hire with
possibility of re-funding. Apply online at  https://psu.jobs/job/62896

CAMPUS SECURITY CRIME STATISTICS: For more about safety at Penn State, and
to review the Annual Security Report which contains information about crime
statistics and other safety and security matters, please go to
http://www.police.psu.edu/clery/, which will also provide you with detail on
how to request a hard copy of the Annual Security Report.

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is
committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants
without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation,
gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

Post Doctoral fellow Avery Rizio appears in Penn State News

Congratulations to Avery Rizio, currently a Post Doctoral fellow with Michele Diaz, whose research made an appearance on Penn State News. As a graduate student, Avery worked with Dr. Nancy Dennis on the issue of directed memory forgetting. Click here to learn more about her research findings.

CLS alum Dr. Jim Michnowicz conducts innovative research on Spanish in North Carolina

"We are trying to point out the benefits of being bilingual and demonstrate why it is important to preserve Spanish specifically in North Carolina." This quote is from Penn State alum Dr. Jim Michnowicz, whose innovative and community-oriented research on Spanish in North Carolina was recently featured in NC State's Technician. Read more about it here:


CLS alum Dr. Jim Michnowicz conducts innovative research on Spanish in North Carolina

Post Doctoral fellow Clara Cohen appears in Penn State News

This recent piece from the Penn State News includes a very reader friendly description of PIRE Postdoctoral fellow Clara Cohen's interesting research language processing in bilinguals and monolinguals. Check it out, and let us know what you think!

Language in the eye of the beholder 

Andrea Takahesu Tabori receives honorable mention for NSF GRFP award

Congratulations to Andrea Takahesu Tabori (graduate student with Judith Kroll) who received an honorable mention for the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP).  

Gabriela Terrazas will join graduate program at the University of Pittsburgh

Congratulations to Gabriela Terrazas, currently one of the lab managers/research technologists for the CLS, who will become a doctoral student at the University of Pittsburgh in the fall of 2016. She will be joining the Department of Psychology to work with Professor Natasha Tokowicz.

Investigating the speech of hissing cockroaches at Mount Nittany Middle School

On March 23rd, 2016 we extended our research to the "speech" of hissing cockroaches at a Community Science Night at Mount Nittany Middle School. More pictures of this event coming soon!

Melinda Fricke accepts tenure-track position at the University of Pittsburgh

Congratulations to Melinda Fricke (Post-doctoral researcher with Judith Kroll & Giuli Dussias) who has accepted a tenure-track position in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Pittsburgh.

Reception in honor of Dr. Judith Kroll

It is with great pleasure that we invite you to join us as we honor Dr. Judith Kroll on April 27, 2016 in celebration of her many years of service at Penn State University and at the Center for Language Science. The event will begin with opening remarks from Dean Susan Welch, followed by a lecture on bilingualism given by Dr. Kroll, and will conclude the event with a reception following the lecture.

Job announcement: Two-year postdoctoral position (location: University of Toronto)

Job announcement: Two-year postdoctoral position (location: University of Toronto) on nonverbal cognitive predictors of dual language development in children. This is an SSHRC-funded collaborative project of Elina Mainela-Arnold (U. Turku, Finland), Luigi Girolametto (U. Toronto, Canada) and CLS researchers Carol Miller, Janet van Hell, and Dan Weiss. For more information, see link to full job announcement:

 

Professors Janet van Hell, Evan Bradley, and CLS graduate student Caitlin Ting featured in Penn State Newswire

A recent piece from the Penn State Newswire features some of the cutting-edge research being conducted by Penn State professors Janet van Hell (CLS Co-Director) and Evan Bradley, and CLS graduate student Caitlin Ting. Their project seeks to investigate the relationship between musical training and language ability.

Click on the link to learn more about this cutting-edge research: The Sound of Language 

David Counselman (former PhD student in the department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese) is promoted to Associate Professor at Ohio Wesleyan University

Congratulations to Professor David Counselman, former PhD student in the department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, who has recently received a promotion to Associate Professor at Ohio Wesleyan University. You can find out more about Professor Counselman's current status by visiting his university webpage.

Zofia Wodniecka is awarded research grant

Congratulations to Zofia Wodniecka (visiting scholar from Jagiellonian University, Krakow) who has been awarded a research grant to examine the short- and long-term consequences of second language immersion in the native language.

Ines Martin & Kaitlyn Litcofsky receive Language Learning Dissertation Grant Awards

Congratulations to Ines Martin (German Applied Linguistics) and Kaitlyn Litcofsky (Cognitive Psychology) who have each been awarded a dissertation support grant from Language Learning to help fund their research. 

Lauren Perrotti receives Penn State Alumni Association Scholarship

Congratulations to Lauren Perrotti (Spanish Linguistics and Language Science) who has been selected by the Graduate School as the recipient of the Penn State Alumni Association Scholarship for 2015-16.

Matthew Carlson, Michael Putman, and David Reitter receive Fellowship from the Social Science Research Institute

Congratulations to Professors Matthew Carlson, Michael Putman, and David Reitter, who have been awarded a Collaborative Fellowship from the Social Science Research Institute for their project titled "Competition, conflict, and optimization: Toward a dynamic model of multilingualism”. 

Click here for more details on the Fellowship awards.

The CLS community presents at the 2016 LSA Annual Meeting

This year we had seven members from the CLS community who presented their work at the Linguistic Society of America (LSA) 2016 Annual Meeting that was held January 7-10 in Washington, DC:

Melinda Fricke: Perceiving vocal similarity in the AXB paradigm: A study in non-accommodation.

Evan Bradley (with Janet van Hell): Effects of musical ear training on lexical tone perception.

Miguel Ramos & Christopher Champi: Subject pronoun expression in Early Spanish: Evidence for linguistic continuity and change.

Lauren Perrotti: Diachronic constraints on the italian masculine article lo.

Lindsay Butler: The role of set size in the production and comprehension of optional number agreement.   

 

Dr. Rachel Wu (UC Riverside) selected as the CLS 2016 Young Language Science Scholar

Dr. Rachel Wu has been selected by our students as the CLS 2016 Young Language Science Scholar.  Visit our CLS Speaker Series tab for more information.

Call for Papers: Translating Research to Practice in the Language Sciences

Call for Papers: Translating Research to Practice in the Language Sciences

Special Issue of Translational Issues in Psychological Science (TPS)

Submissions accepted from January 15 - March 1, 2016

We are encouraging submissions for consideration in a special issue titled "Translating Research to Practice in the Language Sciences" in the innovative journal titled Translational Issues in Psychological Science, co-sponsered by the American Psychological Association (APA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS). 

"Translating Research to Practice in the Language Sciences" is due out in March of 2017. For this issue, the Editors will consider manuscripts across a broad area of language science research concerning such topics as:

  • Cognitive and neural consequences of bilingualism
  • Enhancing second language learning
  • Raising bilingual children
  • Global perspectives on language science
  • Language and aging
  • Advances in the neuroscience of language
  • Language development and atypical trajectories
  • Translating language science to the classroom
  • Literacy across the lifespan and language context
  • Other important and timely topics in language science research

Manuscripts submitted to TPS should be co-authored by at least one psychologist in training (graduate student, postdoctoral fellow), should be written concisely for a broad audience, and focus on the practical implication of the research presented in the manuscript. Click here to visit the TPS website for more information about the journal, including detailed instructions to authors.

Kinsey Bice - Recommended for an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Award

Congratulations to Kinsey Bice (Cognitive Psychology and Language Science) who has been recommended for funding through the NSF's Linguistic Program - Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement (Ling-DDRI) Award, based on her dissertation grant proposal: Dynamics of language processing and the consequences for new language learning.

The CLS community presents at the 2015 Psychonomic Society

This year we had 12 members from the CLS community who presented their work at the Psychonomic Society's 56th Annual Meeting that was held November 19-22, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois:

Anne Beatty-Martinez: Code-Switching as a Tool to Elucidate the Relationship Between Language Production & Language Comprehension.

Caitlin Ting: Syntactic Processing in Music: The Role of Cognitive Control and Prior Experience With Language and Music.

Carla Fernández: How Switching Direction and Foreign Accented Speech Affect Listening to Code-Switched Sentences: An Electrophysiological Study.

Carrie Jackson: Learning Grammatical Gender in a New Language: The Impact of Prior Language Learning Experience at First Exposure.

Christian Navarro-Torres: Examining Structural Constraints in Spanish-English Bilingual Speech Production.

Gabriela Terrazas: On the Consequences of Bilingualism for Inhibitory Control.

Haoyun Zhang: Effect of 3-day Language Switching Training on Cognitive Control Mechanisms.

Kinsey Bice: Regulating the L1 Across Contexts to Investigate L2 Acquisition.

Patricia Román: Cognitive Processes Involved in Sentence Comprehension in Spanish/English Code-Switchers: An ERP Study.

Patricia Schempp: Grammatical Gender Violations Affect Cognate Nouns, but not Noncognates, in Intermediate-Level L2 Learners: An ERP Study.

Sarah Grey: Foreign Accented Speech and Sentence Comprehension in Bilinguals: An Electrophysiological Study.

Zofia Wodniecka: Dissociable Indices of Language Control in Bilingual Speech.


Click here to view pictures of the event.

Ines Martin - RGSO Dissertation Support Award

Congratulations to Ines Martin, who has been awarded an RGSO dissertation support grant for her work on improving novice learners’ L2 pronunciation in distance and face-to-face learning environments!

Angela Grant - Ray Lombra Graduate Student Award in Excellence in Research in the Humanities and Social Science

Congratulations to Angela Grant who has been selected for the Ray Lombra Graduate Student Award in Excellence in Research in the Humanities and Social Science!

Call for Papers (PSUxLing3)

PSUxLing3 is the 3rd annual Penn State Undergraduate Exhibition in Hispanic and General Linguistics and will take place on October 14, 2016 on the University Park Campus. Undergraduate students should submit their abstracts by May 15, 2016 to: . Abstracts can be on any language and in any subfield of linguistics: psycholinguistics, theoretical linguistics, social linguistics, applied linguistics. They can be completed works, or works in progress.

NSF announces a press release on the new PIRE awards

The Center for Language Science has recently been awarded with one of the 17 NSF's Partnerships in International Research and Education (PIRE) awards. The NSF made an official press release on Friday September 25, 2015, and has chosen one of our CLS pictures as the lead picture. For more information, please visit:

http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=136248

Adele Miccio Travel Award for 2015-16

Our late colleague, Professor Adele Miccio, loved to travel and cared deeply for students. In her honor, the Center for Language Science sponsors a student travel award. Although many graduate students attend professional conferences, it is often difficult in this context for them to meet and discuss their work with more senior scientists. Networking experiences are an important way in which individuals become known in the professional community, develop collaborative relationships, and arrange informal visits outside of professional meetings. Given the relatively short time frame of the probationary tenure period, it is essential that individuals learn to make these connections to others in the field early in their careers. Therefore, the purpose of this award is to provide incentives for planned networking and resources for these experiences. Applicants for the award will generate a plan for travel to meet with one or more senior scientists. In most cases, the applicant will visit the laboratory or working environment of the scientist. In some cases, the applicant will attend a conference or workshop where s/he can arrange meetings with one or more senior scientists. If meetings at a conference are proposed, the applicant must explain how there will be adequate time for meaningful private meetings in that context. After the travel plan is completed, the student will provide a brief written report of the experience, and will give a presentation at a CLS meeting to share the experience with other students. Here are examples of the types of networking experiences that have proven beneficial in the past:

  • The applicant makes a two-day visit to a university with an active language science program. While there, the applicant presents at a colloquium and a lab meeting, meets with graduate students and post-docs from several labs, has meetings with several faculty members whose research is relevant the applicant’s own, and has 2 extended meetings with the researcher who is the sponsor of the visit. In these meetings, the applicant receives detailed feedback on a manuscript and a grant proposal, and future collaboration is planned.
  • In another scenario, the applicant attends a small international conference at which several researchers from Europe will be present - people who live too far from the applicant for a lab visit to be feasible. Because the conference is relatively small and does not include parallel sessions, the applicant is able to arrange ahead of time to meet 3 of the international researchers individually to discuss their presentations as well as preliminary data collected by the applicant. One of these meetings occurs soon after the applicant’s own presentation, so s/he is able to receive direct and immediate feedback. One of the researchers agrees to serve as a consultant on a grant application.

 

Submission requirements

1. Cover sheet with the following information: Your name, department, address, phone number, email address, and the name of your advisor(s). Indicate type of networking: either visiting another lab or targeted networking at a conference. Applicants must be doctoral students who have passed their candidacy exam, and must be regular attendees of the CLS Friday morning meetings. Please note that unlike the PIRE grant, the Miccio Award is intended to support professional development through networking, not direct research activity. Be sure that your application describes a networking plan. Our resources are limited, so applicants who have received a previous Miccio Award will not be eligible.

2. Provide a networking plan:A 1-page, single-spaced, 12-point font summary of:                  

a. Networking plan and its impact on the applicant’s research program

b. Provide specific reasons for the proposed visit and specific goals to be accomplished during the visit (e.g., collaboration, exchange of ideas, receive input on a grant proposal or a manuscript).

3. If planning a lab visit, state the length of time of the visit and provide a concise justification  for the time frame; i.e., how you will be able to accomplish your goals in the allotted time.

4. If planning to meet one or more individuals at a conference, meeting times should be at least tentatively set and described in the application, explaining how the meeting(s) will be productive in the often hectic atmosphere of a conference; also, explain how the meeting will contribute to your goals in a way that email correspondence would not.

5. Describe the extent of prior contact, if any, with the targeted senior scientist(s). Include the folowing:

a. Letter(s) from the targeted senior scientist(s) confirming the proposed networking plan

b. Letter from your doctoral advisor stating support for the plan

c. budget page showing the projected expenses including travel (e.g., airfare), lodging, conference registration. There is an upper-bound limit of $2,500 for the award.

d. A copy of your up-to-date CV

 

How to submit an application:

  1. All applications should be submitted electronically to the Chair of the travel award committee at the email address shown below. All of the application materials should be combined into a single PDF file, with the materials in the order listed above, and submitted via email to the committee chair as an attachment.
  2. Questions may be addressed to the Chair of the travel award committee.

 

Winners will be required to:

  1. Submit a 1-page report on the networking experience and accomplished goals. If a workshop or conference was attended, a report on the workshop should be included with the submitted report.

b. Present at a CLS meeting to share the networking experience with other graduate students.


Relevant dates:

Deadline for submission: November 1st @ 5pm

Date of announcement of awards: November 13th

Period for using the award: January-December 2016

Deadline for submitting the final report: no later than 6 weeks after returning from the funded trip

Date for CLS Presentation: In the semester following receipt of the award

 

 

John Lipski appointed Director of the Linguistics Program

I am happy to let you know that John Lipski has accepted the position of director of the Linguistics Program.  Many thanks to Janet for her work during these past four years.

Carol Miller promoted to Professor

Congratulations to Carol Miller who has been promoted to the rank of Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders!

Marc Authier promoted to Full Professor

Congratulations to Marc Authier who has recently been promoted to the rank of Full Professor in the Department of French and Francophone studies !

RGSO Funding Awards to CLS Students

Congratulations go to Patricia Schempp, Caitlin Ting, Grant Berry, and Kaitlyn Litcofsky who were awarded RGSO funding from the College of Liberal Arts!

Kinsey Bice - Dingwall Foundation Neurolinguistics Fellow

Congratulations to Kinsey Bice who learned today that she has been selected for a Dingwall Foundation Neurolinguistics Fellowship (http://www.dingwallfoundation.org/neurolinguistics/).

The fellowship will provide funding for 12 months of her doctoral research.

News and CLS transitions

Dear CLS Community,

As we officially end the 2014-15 academic year today, I want to take this moment to mark a number of transitions and to bring everyone up to date on changes that will occur over the 2015-16 academic year.

First, and most important,  please join me in thanking Giuli Dussias and Janet van Hell for their tremendous service to the CLS as associate directors.  Giuli was a founding member of the CLS when we were a handful of people in what was initially the Language Science Research Group. The CLS would not be what it is now if it weren’t for Giuli’s energy, wisdom, and incredibly positive spirit.   Janet joined as an associate director in 2011 when she became the director of the Program in Linguistics and has worked hard to implement the dual title program and its bridge to the CLS and on the PIRE.  We have all benefitted enormously from their contributions to the CLS.  Giuli and Janet will continue as co-PIs on the PIRE project and will of course participate actively in the CLS.  As of July 1, John Lipski will become an associate director of the CLS in his new role as director of the Program in Linguistics, and Karen Miller will also become an associate director of the CLS.  We thank them for their generosity in being willing to step into these positions.  

I have agreed to remain as director of the CLS in 2015-16 to enable a smooth transition.  As most of you know, in July, 2016, I will move to a new faculty position at the University of California, Riverside.  Leaving the CLS will be the hardest part of that change but there are some exciting new academic opportunities and of course we will also be able to live closer to our family.  The goal for this year is to transition into the new phase of CLS development with as few bumps in the road as possible. 

In 2015-16 we will have three lab managers.  Liza Oakes and Gabby Terrazas will continue as lab managers and Lisa Cox will join them in mid-July as a new lab manager.  We will be in touch closer to the start of the term to discuss the arrangements for research support in the CLS labs.  We thank Liza and Gabby for providing such wonderful support in the last year. They were always there when we needed them and impressively creative and resourceful in solving problems.  I also want to take this moment to thank Fengyang Ma for her incredible work as a lab manager before she transitioned to a position at SLEIC.  Fengyang is leaving Penn State at the end of July to take a faculty position at the University of Cincinnati and we wish her all the very best in her new role.

We will be searching this summer for a new position, Assistant CLS Director, that will be advertised in the next few weeks.  This is a position analogous to the assistant director position in the Child Study Center to be held by a Ph.D. level person who can oversee many of the CLS programs that have now grown to take up a great deal of time.  As soon as we have the ad prepared, we will share it with you to distribute to individuals who may be interested.  Once that position is filled, we anticipate being able to hire another staff position in addition to Sharon’s position as Administrative Assistant to the CLS.  As you know, Sharon has been doing the work of three people or more for the CLS!  We anticipate that this new staff position will provide more resources for grants and budgets that will enable Sharon’s position to be more reasonable.  As we acknowledge our colleagues, I want to thank Sharon for all she has done to keep us afloat.  She has not only handled multiple assignments with grace, but she has provided behind the scenes support to students and visitors that is a special contribution to this community and indeed, what makes this community and not simply a place to get your work done!

Many other CLS members will also move to new positions, among those Eleonora Rossi, Pablo Requena, Amelia Dietrich, Rhonda McClain, Jason Gullifer, Nick Henry, and Gerrit-Jan Kootstra.  We wish everyone well in their new positions and invite you to remain on the CLS listserv to have your inboxes cluttered with announcements and to keep us posted on developments.  I want to say a special thank you to Eleonora for whom no request for support was ever too little or too big.  She not only signed up with enthusiasm to help in every possible way, but has been a model of intellectual pursuit that transformed the CLS community. 

Finally, just to keep you informed, as most of you know, the CLS faculty submitted a new proposal for PIRE support.  Our PIRE proposal will be reviewed this summer and we will keep you posted on the outcome of that process, but I thought it would be helpful for the entire CLS community to have an opportunity to read the text of the proposal to see what we have been planning.  We have absolutely no idea whether this particular proposal will be successful, but we do have a sense that this is the direction that we want to develop, whether via PIRE support or some other means.  Whatever the outcome, we will need everyone’s involvement and input to shape the agenda for this next phase of our work together.  

Have a wonderful summer!

Judy

Welcome to Lisa Cox!

Please join me in welcoming Lisa Cox to the CLS.  Lisa will be a new lab manager starting later in July.  She recently completed her B.A. at the College of William and Mary in psychology and linguistics.  Her email is: Lisa Cox <lmcox@email.wm.edu>.  She will be visiting State College soon to find housing.  If anyone knows of good housing options available by July, please get in touch with her!

Congratulations to Jason Gullifer!

Congratulations to Jason Gullifer who successfully defended his dissertation last week and learned that his NRSA proposal for a postdoctoral fellowship at McGill University has been recommended for funding by NIH.  The NRSA will provide Jason with three years of postdoc support to learn to do structural imaging research with Debra Titone and Denise Klein on the project:
Determining the Neurocognitive Consequences of a Natural Switch in Language Immersion Context: Evidence from the Uniquely Bilingual City of Montreal

Jason may need to learn to speak French! 

New paper on acquisition of the Spanish copulas in Puerto Rican children

For anyone interested in the Spanish copulas 'ser' and 'estar', Pablo and Karen Miller have a new paper on Puerto Rican children's acquisition of the Spanish copulas - It just came out and, to our delight, was recently acknowledged by the journal of Language Acquisition as an important paper on the acquisition of semantics published in their journal.
To access the paper, follow this link: http://tandf.msgfocus.com/q/1HvphLuii5xSuMh68LpbK/wv

CLS members win BLC poster awards at ISB10

Our current and former CLS members won two of the Bilingualism: Language and Cognition poster awards at the recent ISB10 meeting!

Congratulations Jason Gullifer, Christian Navarro-Torres, Grant Berry, and Susan Bobb!

Great CLS pride!!!

CUNY Workshop on Bilingualism and Executive Function Videos

 

Some of us attended the CUNY Workshop on Bilingualism and Executive Function.  You can now watch the entire two day workshop on Youtube:

 

May 18: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iqr4R_oCO8

May 19: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJcP8MuZfn4

CLS students awarded NSF GRFP distinctions

Congratulations to CLS graduate student Federica Bulgarelli (Psychology, advisor: Dan Weiss) who was one of thirteen Penn State students to be awarded a fellowship from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

Also congratulations to CLS graduate student Carla Fernandez (Psychology, advisor: Janet van Hell) who received an honorable mention.

CLS Paper at Congress of the International Association for the Study of Child Language in Amsterdam

Center for Language Science alumnus Gerard Poll and CLS/PIRE faculty Carol Miller and Janet van Hell presented a paper at the Congress of the International Association for the Study of Child Language in Amsterdam.  The title was, "Interactions of Sentence Structure and Working Memory: Results from a Sentence Repetition Task."

PIRE student honors and distinctions

Several CLS have received honors or distinctions:

PIRE undergraduate fellow Emma Hance has been selected as 2014 Teach for America corps member. 

PIRE graduate fellow Courtney Johnson-Fowler received an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant, a Language Learning dissertation support grant, and a Fulbright fellowship to Austria for 2014-2015.

PIRE undergraduate fellow Brendan Tomoschuk has received the 2014 Center for Global Studies Thesis Prize for the PIRE research reported in his honors thesis. 

PIRE undergraduate fellow Kaylee Roupas received a Fulbright teaching assistantship to Romania for 2014-15.

PIRE Undergraduate fellow Leah Pappas has been selected into the TAPIF program to teach in French Guyana in 2014-15.

Photos from Bilingualism Matters @ Penn State Launch Event

On Wednesday, December 10, the Center for Language Science became first US chapter of Bilingualism Matters (http://bilingualism-matters.org.uk). See photos from the event by clicking the link below.

The Latest Research On Bilingualism And The Brain

Ellen Bialystok, Judith Kroll, and Michael Ullman are interviewed on the Diane Rehm Show to share the latest research on bilingualism and the brain.

Visit the following link to access the show:

http://thedianerehmshow.org/shows/2014-12-16/the_latest_research_on_bilingualism_and_the_brain

PSUxLING 2015

The Penn State University Exhibition in Hispanic and General Linguistics (PSUxLING) event will take place on October 16, 2015. Keynote speakers are: Anna Maria Escobar (University of Illinois) and Jorge Valdes Kroff (University of Florida). For more information, see: https://sites.google.com/site/psuxling2/home

Bilingualism Matters @ Penn State

On Wednesday, December 10, the Center for Language Science has become the first US chapter of Bilingualism Matters (http://bilingualism-matters.org.uk). Bilingualism Matters is an organization based out of the University of Edinburgh that trains researchers to do outreach so that the basic science on bilingualism can be communicated to a range of individuals, from parents raising bilingual children, to educators in schools, and to policy makers in government. Dr. Antonella Sorace, who founded and directs Bilingualism Matters, and is a professor of Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh, has visited the Center for Language Science from December 10-12 to conduct training on how to do this sort of outreach. For information and media associated with other recently launched chapters, see: http://www.bilingualism-matters.ppls.ed.ac.uk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FS6o0QN8y8